The 1200 HP Zenvo TSR-S Brings New Meaning to "Active Aero" With Wild Tilting Wing

Posted by: Jesse Kleib on 11/16/2021

At 1200 hp, the Zenvo TSR-S is a rather impressive machine. Mix that with the aggressive looks of the supercar and we have a formula for admiration. However, it doesn’t seem to be the looks or the power output that has most people attracted to this car. Instead, it’s something entirely different and a feature that has drummed up quite a bit of controversy.

The TSR-S is a machine that has active aero onboard. This isn’t something that’s anything new, in concept. For years, we have seen high-end automobiles with spoilers that retract and deploy depending on the situation. If a car needs more downforce or less downforce, the spoiler will come and go as it pleases, usually with the help of hydraulics.

In the land of the TSR-S, though, the active aero is working much harder. Instead of the spoiler going up and down, this thing is slinging its way around in all directions. As a car shoots around corners, the spoiler tilts from left to right, giving it a new take on aerodynamics. It almost looks like there’s a mechanical bull hanging off the back of the car.

In theory, this seems like a pretty genius idea. After all, with the changing dynamic of a race track and flow of wind, adapting to that wind and making the most of it seems appropriate. We certainly aren’t engineers but we have to think that somebody very smart put a lot of thought into developing a system like this. Some have even claimed that the system is “Brilliant” and seems to “Maximize grip.”

On the other hand, though, there are some detractors with backgrounds in engineering who seem to think that it’s simply not an effective strategy. We aren’t going to dissect the entire argument here but a couple of clicks can find both sides of the argument on Google. In fact, that seems to be the main talking point when this model is brought up. I mean, how could it not be? Just look at it!

In either situation, the video below shows off the interesting wing in action. Whether it’s the most effective way of creating downforce or not, we can’t help but be mesmerized by its movement.